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In this News page we have gathered links to the latest Health and Beauty News from around the web, for our readers.

 

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A combination of Merck & Co's immunotherapy Keytruda and Pfizer Inc's Inlyta helped patients with advanced kidney cancer live longer than those receiving and older Pfizer standalone therapy, according to data from a late-stage study presented on Saturday.
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Reuters Health
Shop awesome deals on makeup sets and palettes at up to 50 percent off at Nordstrom from brands like MAC, Stila, Benefit Cosmetics, T3, and more.
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Beauty News
New research has begun to identify the circumstances by examining relationships between early age of first intoxication (less than 15 years), drinking in different contexts such as one's own home, at friends' homes, or outdoor settings, and problems that arise in those contexts.
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Science Daily
Researchers report that a new nuclear medicine tracer may allow better diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). Acute VTE is a disease that includes deep-vein thrombosis and its complication, pulmonary embolism, which can be fatal.
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Science Daily
Indonesia will push back by as much as seven years an October deadline for halal labels on food, drugs and cosmetics, after industry voiced fears the move could bring chaos and threaten supplies of life-saving vaccines and other products.
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Reuters Health
Mother's milk provides sustenance for babies. Now researchers find pumped breast milk exposes newborns to more disease-causing bacteria than milk directly from the breast. The discovery suggests breastfeeding practices could shift the makeup of microorganisms in breast milk and infants' digestive systems. “We were surprised that the method of feeding was the most consistent factor associated with milk microbiota composition,” said Meghan Azad, a medical geneticist at the Children's Hospit
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Discover
How many eye creams is too many again? We've rounded up the seven best eye creams on Amazon right now, according to customers. Each eye cream has at least a 4-star rating.
Fri, Feb 15, 2019
Source: Beauty News
Worried about losing your hair? Don't wait—before you know it, it will be too late. Take action now with Revivogen, an all-natural hair regrowth program that has helped thousands of men get fuller, thicker hair. And it can help you, too. 7 Biggest Grooming Mistakes Balding Men Make Revivogen is a dermatologist-formulated, all-natural solution that combats male and female-pattern baldness (andorgenic alopecia). It's formulated with natural ingredients that inhibit DHT, the hormonal byproduct that causes shedding. Overwhelming scientific evidence for the effectiveness of Revivogen's ingredients has been published in reputable medical journals worldwide and confirmed by multiple independent studies. Why Are You Balding? Guys, hair growth is part of our genetic makeup. your DNA dictates your predisposition to baldness. When these hair loss genes are present, they can be triggered by DHT (Di-Hydro Testosterone), a hormone present in both men and women after puberty. Revivogen is different than other natural hair restoration treatments because it stops the thinning process by targeting DHT production. When testosterone enters the hair follicles through gateways known as androgen receptors, it interacts with enzymes that convert it to DHT. Revivogen blocks these androgen receptors, preventing testosterone from entering the cell. Once DHT production is reduced, hair thinning genes become dormant and follicles begin producing healthy, normal hair again. How to Go Bald in Style and Comfort Within six to eight weeks, you'll see a decrease in hair shedding and a difference in how your hair looks and feels. Within six to twelve months, your scalp looks fuller and denser. Maximum benefit occurs within 12 to 18 months of continued use. Because Revivogen is applied directly to the scalp, it blocks the DHT only at the hair follicles. This transforms thin and lifeless hair into thicker, fuller and healthier hair without reducing DHT elsewhere in the body and causing undesirable side effects. So if you're going bald, give Revivogen a shot. If you're not satisfied after three months, you can return it for a full refund. The only thing you have to lose is your hair. Browse the full line of REVIVOGEN Scalp Treatments HERE Revivogen MD Scalp TherapyRevivogen MD Scalp Therapy has been helping men (and women) achieve thicker, fuller, and healthier hair since 1999. These natural ingredients have been proven to reduce DHT production, block the androgen receptors, limit DHT uptake, and initiate the hair follicles rejuvenative cycle. Independent clinical studies found an 88 percent success rate. Get a three-month supply for $99 HERE Revivogen Revivogen MD Shampoo and ConditionerThis gentle, sulfate-free shampoo is specially formulated with the same active ingredients found in the topical formula to complement its activity. While cleansing the hair it removes Sebum and DHT from the scalp helps to relieve irritation. The conditioner delivers important bioactive nutrients to create a healthy scalp environment for hair rejuvenation. Get both for $48 ($64 value) HERE Revivogen The post This Dermatologist-Formulated Treatment Helps Fight Thinning Hair at the Source appeared first on Men's Journal.
Thu, Feb 14, 2019
Source: Mens Journal
At breakfast, order a side of whole-wheat toast—for your heart. University of Eastern Finland scientists found that whole grains contain compounds that improve glucose metabolism—how sugar is processed—which can help stave off illness, including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. In the study, 123 people at risk for heart issues ate a diet either high or low in whole grains for 12 weeks. The high group had more betaine compounds in their blood, which improves cell function. One compound acts similarly to the way certain heart drugs do—and eating whole-grain pasta is more fun than popping a pill. 15 Healthy Grains Every Guy Should Know The post Eating More Whole Grains Is the Easiest Way to Protect Your Heart appeared first on Men's Journal.
Thu, Feb 14, 2019
Source: Mens Journal
Navigating Aging Navigating Aging focuses on medical issues and advice associated with aging and end-of-life care, helping America's 45 million seniors and their families navigate the health care system. To contact Judith Graham with a question or comment, click here. Join the Navigating Aging Facebook Group. See All Columns About 25 million Americans who are aging in place rely on help from other people and devices such as canes, raised toilets or shower seats to perform essential daily activities, according to a new study documenting how older adults adapt to their changing physical abilities. But a substantial number don't get adequate assistance. Nearly 60 percent of seniors with seriously compromised mobility reported staying inside their homes or apartments instead of getting out of the house. Twenty-five percent said they often remained in bed. Of older adults who had significant difficulty putting on a shirt or pulling on undergarments or pants, 20 percent went without getting dressed. Of those who required assistance with toileting issues, 27.9 percent had an accident or soiled themselves. The study, by researchers from Johns Hopkins University, focuses on how older adults respond to changes in physical function — a little-studied and poorly understood topic. It shows that about one-third of older adults who live in the community — nearly 13 million seniors — have a substantial need for assistance with daily activities such as bathing, eating, getting dressed, using the toilet, transferring in and out of bed or moving around their homes; about one-third have relatively few needs; and another third get along well on their own with no notable difficulty. For older adults and their families, the report is a reminder of the need to plan ahead for changing capacities. “The reality is that most of us, as we age, will require help at one point or another,” said Dr. Bruce Chernof, president of the SCAN Foundation and chair of the 2013 federal Commission on Long-Term Care. Citing Medicare's failure to cover so-called long-term services and supports, which help seniors age in place, he said, “We need to lean in much harder if we want to help seniors thrive at home as long as possible.” (KHN's coverage of aging and long-term care issues is supported in part by the SCAN Foundation.) Previous reports have examined the need for paid or unpaid help in the older population and the extent to which those needs go unmet. Notably, in 2017, the same group of Johns Hopkins researchers found that 42 percent of older adults with probable dementia or difficulty performing daily activities didn't get assistance from family, friends or paid caregivers — an eye-opening figure. Of seniors with at least three chronic conditions and high needs, 21 percent lacked any kind of assistance. But personal care isn't all that's needed to help older adults remain at home when strength, flexibility, muscle coordination and other physical functions begin to deteriorate. Devices and home modifications can also help people adjust. Email Sign-Up Subscribe to KHN's free Morning Briefing. Sign Up Please confirm your email address below: Sign Up Until this new study, it hasn't been clear how often older adults use “assistive devices”: canes, walkers, wheelchairs and scooters for people with difficulties walking; shower seats, tub seats and grab bars to help with bathing; button hooks, reachers, grabbers and specially designed clothes for people who have difficulty dressing; special utensils designed to make eating easier; and raised toilets or toilet seats, portable commodes and disposable pads or undergarments for individuals with toileting issues. “What we haven't known before is the extent of adjustments that older adults make to manage daily activities,” said Judith Kasper, a co-author of the study and professor at Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. The data comes from a 2015 survey conducted by the National Health and Aging Trends Study, a leading source of information about functioning and disability among adults 65 and older. More than 7,000 seniors filled out surveys in their homes and results were extrapolated to 38.8 million older Americans who live in the community. (Those who live in nursing homes, assisted living centers, continuing care retirement communities and other institutions were excluded.) Among key findings: Sixty percent of the seniors surveyed used at least one device, most commonly for bathing, toileting and moving around. (Twenty percent used two or more devices and 13 percent also received some kind of personal assistance.) Five percent had difficulty with daily tasks but didn't have help and hadn't made other adjustments yet. One percent received help only. Needs multiplied as people grew older, with 63 percent of those 85 and older using multiple devices and getting personal assistance, compared with 23 percent of those between ages 65 and 74. The problem, experts note, is that Medicare doesn't pay for most of these non-medical services, with some exceptions. As a result, many seniors, especially those at or near the bottom of the income ladder, go without needed assistance, even when they're enrolled in Medicaid. (Medicaid community-based services for low-income seniors vary by state and often fall short of actual needs.) The precariousness of their lives is illustrated in a companion report on financial strain experienced by older adults who require long-term services and supports. Slightly more than 10 percent of seniors with high needs experienced at least one type of hardship, such as being unable to pay expenses like medical bills or prescriptions (5.9 percent), utilities (4.8 percent) or rent (3.4 percent), or skipping meals (1.8 percent). (Some people had multiple difficulties, reflected in these numbers.) These kinds of adverse events put older adults' health at risk, while contributing to avoidable hospitalizations and nursing home placements. Given a growing population of seniors who will need assistance, “I think there's a need for Medicare to rethink how to better support beneficiaries,” said Amber Willink, co-author of both studies and an assistant scientist at Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. That's begun to happen, with the passage last year of the CHRONIC Care Act, which allows Medicare Advantage plans to offer supplemental benefits such as wheelchair ramps, bathroom grab bars, transportation and personal care to chronically ill members. But it's unclear how robust these benefits will be going forward; this year, plans, which cover 21 million people, aren't offering much. Meanwhile, 39 million people enrolled in traditional Medicare are left out altogether. “We've had discussions with the [insurance] industry over the last couple of months to explore what's going to happen and it's a big question mark,” said Susan Reinhard, director of AARP Public Policy Institute, which publishes a scorecard on the adequacy of state long-term services and supports with several other organizations. So far, she said, the response seems to be, “Let's wait and see, and is this going to be affordable?” We're eager to hear from readers about questions you'd like answered, problems you've been having with your care and advice you need in dealing with the health care system. Visit khn.org/columnists to submit your requests or tips.
Thu, Feb 14, 2019
Source: Ka Aging

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