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In this News page we have gathered links to the latest Health and Beauty News from around the web, for our readers.

 

Today
Militia violence in Democratic Republic of Congo has prevented aid workers from reaching some potential cases in an outbreak of Ebola that has so far killed 44 people, the World Health Organization said on Friday.
Fri, Aug 17, 2018
Source: Reuters Health
(Reuters Health) - Meeting physical activity guidelines and being physically fit may reduce the risk of developing glaucoma by 40 percent to 50 percent, recent research suggests.
Fri, Aug 17, 2018
Source: Reuters Health
A new study has found that diets both low and high in carbohydrates were linked with an increase in mortality, while moderate consumers of carbohydrates had the lowest risk of mortality. The study also found that low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fats from plant sources were associated with lower risk of mortality compared to those that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fat from animal sources.
Fri, Aug 17, 2018
Source: Science Daily
A new study has uncovered why some people that have brain markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) never develop the classic dementia that others do. The results showed that resilient individuals had a unique synaptic protein signature that set them apart from both demented AD patients and normal subjects with no AD pathology.
Fri, Aug 17, 2018
Source: Science Daily
Earlier
On a misty summer morning in 2015, Manuel Ruiz ditched his pickup truck along a dusty two-track road in northwest Tasmania and trod into a grove of eucalyptus. He was searching for a devil. “If I were a devil, this would be a nice place to spend the night,” thought Ruiz, a wildlife veterinarian and doctoral candidate at the University of Tasmania. The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is the world's largest carnivorous marsupial. Despite that distinction, the animal is only about the
Thu, Aug 16, 2018
Source: Discover
Your skin will thank you for stocking up on best-selling Blue Mercury products from top brands like SK-II, La Mer, Mario Badescu, and more. Get your glow on.
Thu, Aug 16, 2018
Source: Beauty News
Everything you want for summer-ravaged hair from anti-frizz, scalp detox and a spray that promises to cut air-dry time by nearly half.
Thu, Aug 16, 2018
Source: Beauty News
When the news broke in March that Facebook had allowed third-party apps to harvest troves of data from its users to influence U.S. elections, people (rightfully) freaked out. Now here's something else to worry about: Facebook and others are turning your personal health information into a hot business commodity. In 2017, Facebook held a widely reported health summit for pharmaceutical companies to propose ways that user “likes” and demographic information could be enlisted to better target drug ads. After Facebook was outed in the recent scandal, CNBC reported that the company was looking into selling user information to hospitals and medical institutions, including Stanford Medical School and the American College of Cardiology, which are eager to identify patients and build digital profiles that might include diagnoses, tests, prescriptions, and even sex-drive data. That project was put on hold after the Cambridge Analytica debacle, but CEO Mark Zuckerberg confirmed in congressional testimony that his company collects medical information on users. (Facebook declined to comment for this story.) 7 Reasons You Should Quit Facebook Facebook may be among the biggest players, but it's far from alone. This health data can be found in your posts, app downloads, fitness trackers, and phone activity, where it can be gathered and sold to companies eager to know who might need medical products and services. What Facebook has attempted to do is only a snippet of the kinds of health privacy violations hanging over the online world. Now, or in the near future, these could threaten your employability, health-care costs—even your reputation. “Companies want to control and make money off your health data, and what we're seeing is just the beginning of a wave of specialized apps that will gather information on people's diseases and mental health,” says Luke Stark, a technology researcher at Dartmouth College and Harvard University. “This is a big deal, and it's frustrating that right now there's little an individual consumer can do about it.” So what do companies do with your health data, anyway? In some cases it might go to researchers and clinicians who need it to improve treatments, and that could be a good thing, Stark says. “Health care wants to move toward personalized medicine, and they need data about you to provide better care,” he says. But, Stark adds, most organizations looking to grab the data have marketing in mind. Health care is a $3-trillion-plus business that's expected to spend $10 billion on advertising this year. To get their money's worth, companies want all those ads ending up in front of people whose health profiles make them good candidates. The problem is that there's no official protection whatsoever for health information unless it's in a formal health record of the sort your doctor or insurance company would keep. Mention on Twitter that you're heading to the drugstore for allergy medicine, or post an Instagram photo that shows you're overweight, and it's all fair game for anyone hoping to build a sellable health profile. Facebook Wants to Read Your Mind The information doesn't have to be explicitly heath-related, either. Retail giant Target has tracked purchases of toiletries to help determine which of its customers were likely pregnant. Michigan State University researchers were able to identify illegal-drug users by looking for the use of certain types of comments in online posts. And other researchers have linked specific language and images in posts to depression. Any company or individual could do the same—including an employer eager to get rid of employees with health challenges, or an insurance company willing to raise rates on or deny coverage to someone with an illness, a genetic predisposition to disease, or a higher-risk lifestyle. Slower daily runs, waking earlier, fewer check-ins at restaurants and bars—such behavior changes are easy to spot on social media, and can be linked to possible health problems. And if you're one of the millions of users who participate in patient-support groups on Facebook or other platforms, the risks of profiling are that much higher. Facebook has allegedly bragged to advertisers it can place users in 154 different medical categories. And in 2016, Facebook was sued over claims it was targeting health-related ads based on information on its users pulled from cancer websites. Brian Loew, the CEO of the patient support site Inspire, which has 1.5 million members, notes that the company's systems sometimes detect outside bots poring over posts on his site. “They're trying to extract information, but we block them,” Loew says. Protect Your Privacy: Apps That Go The Extra Mile Phone apps are a big potential source of leaky health data, too. If you're using any of the tens of thousands of free and inexpensive apps available to help with dieting, family planning, stress, or virtually any health-related activity or condition, it's wise to assume the company providing the app is prepared to use the data you plug in to its benefit—including selling it. A 2013 study by the privacy-compliance consultancy Evidon, which dove in to the top 20 fitness apps, including MapMyFitness, WebMD Health, and iPeriod, turned up as many as 70 marketing firms that were the recipients of users' health data. The risks of having your health status turned into a product only climb if you wear a Fitbit, Apple Watch, or other wearable fitness and tracking device. Some 50 billion objects on your body, in your home, and sprayed throughout your environment are expected to be Internet- connected over the next 10 years. Think refrigerators, scales, toilets—even bathroom mirrors. In a sense, we all help bring this situation on ourselves by entering into the standard Faustian bargain of social media and app use. “If you're using a consumer app, more often than not you're getting it for free in exchange for giving up data about you,” says Rick Valencia, president of Qualcomm Life, a health-oriented offshoot of the communications chip-making giant. “Once you agree to the licensing agreement, the deal is done. As long as consumers keep blithely clicking, the companies that mine the data are likely to get only better and bolder.” Don't count on the government for protection, either. Health privacy laws apply only to data held by doctors, hospitals, pharmacies, health insurers, medical billing companies, and other mainstream health care players. Even if a social media platform or an app promises not to sell your data, don't trust it. Their terms and conditions have loopholes large enough to drive an ambulance through. Digital Defense: The Best Way to Secure Your Life Online “It's a pretty significant gap in consumer protection,” says Aneesh Chopra, the former chief technology officer in the Obama administration and now the president of CareJourney, a company that helps hospitals analyze data patients have consented to provide. “Our health data effectively becomes the commercial property of the platforms we use.” Chopra helped draft a proposed law to protect that data in 2012, but Congress wouldn't consider it; legislators have been loath to hamper the golden goose that is tech and are fairly clueless about how far the misuse of private data would go, as underscored by the recent congressional hearings over Facebook. For now, you're on your own in preventing your health info from being turned into a product. There are a few steps you can take. When you can, look for FDA-certified health apps and wearable devices, because they fall under the same privacy rules that apply to hospitals. Unfortunately, only a tiny minority of health apps and devices get that certification, as they're typically for specific diseases or conditions, such as cardiac issues and diabetes management. For all apps, health or otherwise, adjust privacy options, and use pseudonyms when possible. Also, Google offers options to prevent it from ever tracking anything about you. For the apps you use most, do a web search on their trustworthiness and privacy. (Facebook recently suspended 200 apps for privacy violations.) And in general, be selective about what behavioral and health information you post online and plug into apps, especially where it's public and linked to your name. Of course, the best of all possible worlds is simply to stay healthy. That will make your data way too boring for most health-care companies to bother. The post Is Someone Stealing Your Health Data? appeared first on Men's Journal.
Thu, Aug 16, 2018
Source: Mens Journal
If you're a bigger fan of breaking a sweat in the comfort of your own home than heading to the gym, it's time to invest in a do-it-all system that doesn't take up a ton of space and works just as hard as you do—and we found just the thing. The Bowflex LateralX System is a low-impact cardio machine system created to improve your natural movement. Fully equipped with all the equipment you need to intensify your workouts, this all-in-one machine glides from side to side as you push, pull, stand, and squat your way through a calorie-burning, muscle-energizing workout. It's a great alternative for pricey home gym equipment and means you never have to wait to use the machine you need at the gym. This system provides a full-body workout instead of hopping from machine to machine. Complete with 30 trainer-led, full-length workout videos, cross functional training, and optional SelectTech dumbbell workouts, you can meet your fitness goals without ever having to step foot in a gym. Plus, in only 16 minutes, you will be able to burn up to 39 percent more calories than a self-paced elliptical workout. With three machines available—the Bowflex LateralX LX3, Bowflex LateralX LX5, and Bowflex Lateral LX5 Performance Pack—you can choose the ideal machine to jumpstart your fitness journey. Get an in depth look at the Bowflex LateralX Systems. Bowflex LateralX LX5If you're ready for something more intense than its junior offering, the Bowflex LateralX LX5 machine is just what you need for an even more challenging workout. Its adjustable lateral range is customizable to suit your desired comfort level for a high energy session in your home. Complete with a free 12-week workout plan with 10 fitness programs, this machine will get you moving (and possibly provide some fun while you're at it). [Originally $2699, now $2399; bowflex.com] Bowflex Bowflex LateralX LX5 Performance PackThis premium system is the mother of all machines. Complete with all the features of its younger model, you also will receive access to a customized Samsung Galaxy Tablet and the Bowflex experience app for the ultimate workout. With your favorite apps on hand, various workout plans, and trainer-led videos, you'll want to cancel your gym gymembership. Packing a powerful punch, this system will sculpt and tone your body to perfection. [Originally $2999, now $2699; bowflex.com] Prices are accurate at the time this article was published, but may change over time. Bowflex The post The Bowflex LateralX System Will Maximize Your Cardio Workouts appeared first on Men's Journal.
Wed, Aug 15, 2018
Source: Mens Journal
Millions of years ago, a gene in mammals became useless. Now scientists have discovered the gene has come back to life in elephants, where it's exceptionally good at killing damaged cells. The “zombie” gene may explain why the long-lived pachyderms rarely develop cancer and how large animals evolved. A Cancer Mystery Elephants are a paradox for scientists. The giants appear largely resistant to cancer, which is odd as their long lifespans and humongous size ought to make them highly suscep
Wed, Aug 15, 2018
Source: Discover

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