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In this News page we have gathered links to the latest Health and Beauty News from around the web, for our readers.

 

Today
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed 62 cases of acute flaccid myelitis, a rare, polio-like condition that causes weakness in the arms or legs, across 22 states.
Wed, Oct 17, 2018
Source: Reuters Health
There just aren't enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kidney with the potential to make dialysis more convenient, comfortable and effective.
Wed, Oct 17, 2018
Source: Science Daily
What happens to those who behave unselfishly and make sacrifices for the sake of others? According to an interdisciplinary study, unselfish people tend both to have more children and to receive higher salaries, in comparison to more selfish people.
Wed, Oct 17, 2018
Source: Science Daily
U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis on Wednesday visited a former American air base in southern Vietnam that will soon become the biggest-ever U.S. cleanup site for contamination left by the defoliant Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.
Wed, Oct 17, 2018
Source: Reuters Health
Earlier
Psilocybin mushrooms, the “magic” fungi famous for giving users hallucinations and spiritual insight, may not actually be supernatural, but they come pretty close. A growing body of research suggests they might help treat a range of mental disorders, and there's little evidence that they're addictive. But the world of magic mushrooms extends far beyond psilocybin. Though they may not have intended it, these fungal chemical factories are synthesizing chemicals that just so happen to carry
Tue, Oct 16, 2018
Source: Discover
Nexus fitness tracker app
Want a tracker, but don't spend much time biking, swimming, or running? You're in good company. The big void in fitness tracking has always been weightlifting and metabolic conditioning workouts. The devices follow your runs and interpret heart rate just fine, but generally cannot estimate how much work you did on the weights floor. Enter Nexus, the first wearable for the masses that counts burpees, clean and jerks, wall balls, et al. Nexus fitness tracker app Courtesy Image It's easy to use: Decide what's on tap (moves, reps, sets), enter it in the app, turn on the electronic tracker—which slips into a compression sleeve—then get after it. It'll detect your movements through space (e.g. box jumps, kettlebell swings, handstand walks) to measure your external output. Algorithms then analyze those data points. The intel syncs to the app so you can review your power output and times, and compare workout performance, week over week. You don't just get numbers, but insight on how to improve. For instance, Nexus can track round splits so you can better pace your WOD and prevent early burnout. You can also find your cadence—average reps per minute—to identify exercises you struggle the most with. [$299; trainwithnexus.com] How to Protect Your Fitness Tracker and Smartphone From Hackers The post Finally, a Fitness Tracker Fit for Weightlifting, HIIT, and CrossFit appeared first on Men's Journal.
Tue, Oct 16, 2018
Source: Mens Journal
I was convinced I would become an adult when I turned 21. But now, I'm certain that turning 65 was the watershed moment that finally grew me up. I'm pleased as pomegranate punch to be 65 — and alive. Not just alive and breathing, but actively engaged in making the right choices about this next chapter. “We enter this phase of life without a playbook or anything equivalent to institutions like elementary school and college that prepare youth for adulthood,” said James Firman, CEO of the National Council on Aging, who turned 65 two years ago. “There's really nothing to prepare us for the transition to this next phase of life.” Bruce Horovitz plays Wallyball with friends early every Friday morning at a local recreation center in Falls Church, Va.(Credit: Alan Frank) My playbook on preparing for life after 65: Consider enrolling in Medicare Part A, to cover hospitalization expenses. It works for me because my family is still covered under my wife's health care plan. Double up on checkups. My annual visit to my primary care doctor evolved into a biannual visit. “Age 65 is a time to proactively visit a geriatric physician instead of just going when you're in trouble,” said Dr. Ardeshir Hashmi, director of the Center for Geriatric Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. “Don't wait until things get to a point where you're in a cycle of being in and out of the hospital all the time.” Starting at age 65, he said, these visits should last longer than the standard 20 minutes — so older patients have time to discuss what's on their minds. Older patients who do this regularly tend to require “minor tweaks” instead of major repairs, said Hashmi. Schedule annual visits to the dermatologist, ophthalmologist — and visits every five years to the gastroenterologist. “Establishing a coordinated care team becomes more important at 65,” said Jean Setzfand, senior vice president of programs at AARP. Take the leap and sign up for long-term health insurance. My wife and I finally did after putting it off for years. Remember, it's a lot easier — and cheaper — to get when you're younger than 65. Stick to a vaccine regimen. Vaccines are important again. I've since received my first pneumonia vaccine. My doctor also told me to get the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, because I developed shingles about five years ago. Evaluate your diet. I have mostly stopped eating red meat, except for the very occasional burger. I now opt for meals mostly composed of fruit, veggies and my new diet staple that I used to gag on as a kid: salmon. Bone up on Social Security. I attended a free county-funded seminar at the local library. Then, to discuss my personal needs, I met (for free) with the same volunteer who led the seminar. Challenge your financial plan. I changed financial advisers — based on recommendations from trusted friends — because my portfolio really matters now. Serve your community. I bumped-up my volunteer schedule to once a week instead of once a month at a local food pantry. I also volunteer every other week at a local homeless shelter on the 5 p.m.-to-midnight shift. I've most recently started to volunteer at an equestrian therapy center for kids with mental or physical handicaps. Each of my volunteer gigs reflect my personal interests. Stay active. I extended my daily exercise routine from five days to seven. I now swim at least five days a week; take our dog, Shadow, for 45-minute walks twice daily; and hit the weight room at least twice weekly. I also play Wallyball (a fast-moving form of indoor volleyball where the walls are considered inbounds) every week with friends who are equally motivated to stay in shape. Stay flexible. I learned to stretch my back muscles an extra long time before beginning any strenuous exercise. When I forget, I inevitably pay for it. Look to the future. I initiated “adult,” end-of-life conversations with my kids that I wish my parents had had with me. Get your paperwork in order. I not only updated my will but I filled out a “Five Wishes” end-of-life pamphlet created by the Aging With Dignity nonprofit group; and I got very specific, in writing, about where I want my ashes to be scattered. Stay connected — and not solely to devices. I stopped taking my friends for granted, banished past grudges and re-established contact with a best buddy from college whose friendship I'd foolishly let slip away. Bruce Horovitz, who volunteers weekly for the Arlington (Va.) Food Assistance Center, mans a booth to recruit student volunteers during an event at George Mason High School in Falls Church, Va.(Credit: Marybeth Connelly/Falls Church City Public Schools) Horovitz takes his dog, Shadow, on two 45-minute walks daily.(Courtesy of Bruce Horovitz) Age 65 is when many of us realize that we're mortal. “This is when we start thinking about our next 20 to 30 years,” said Hashmi. “It's when we ask: How can I be smart about investing my remaining decades wisely?” Eric Tyson, author of “Personal Finance After 50 for Dummies,” theorizes that one of the most powerful undercurrents of turning 65 is how it affects the working lives of so many Americans. It's when the majority go from working full time to working less — or not working at all, he said. “The best scenario is when this change can unfold over many years instead of all at once.” It has for me. Things started changing at age 62, when I took a buyout from USA TODAY, where I'd worked for 20-plus years as a marketing reporter. I'm now a freelance writer and media training consultant. Email Sign-Up Subscribe to KHN's free Morning Briefing. Sign Up Please confirm your email address below: Sign Up So, at 65, the one thing I've opted to put off for at least a few years is retiring. While 65 still remains the most common retirement age, more and more folks are breaking that tradition, said AARP's Setzfand. Call it living with purpose. Turning 65 is not just an extension of middle age. It's a new life chapter that's waiting to be written. “It's a new stage of life that reminds us we don't have forever,” said Firman. About a decade ago, at age 56, Firman had a quintuple bypass operation. His father, grandfather and uncle all died of heart disease in their 40s and 50s. Firman isn't distraught over the family genes he inherited. Instead, he's celebrating his survival. When he turned 65 two years ago, he said, he had a realization that the real purpose of aging is to make the world a better place. “Life is a gift,” he said. “Success in old age starts with an attitude of gratitude.” It seems Firman and I share one common trait: We both grew up at 65. KHN's coverage of these topics is supported by John A. Hartford Foundation and The SCAN Foundation
Mon, Oct 15, 2018
Source: Ka Aging
As a broad group, button mushrooms are native to many regions of the world and can still be found growing wild worldwide. However, cultivation of button mushrooms also began far back in time in many regions of the world, and especially in parts of ...
Sun, Oct 14, 2018
Source: WH Foods
Yes, intake of vitamin B12 can often be a problem in a vegetarian diet. For example, in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003-2010, only 55% of vegetarians were determined to meet their daily B12 requirements, in ...
Sun, Oct 14, 2018
Source: WH Foods
Thanks to these unconventional liquid eyeliner hacks to draw the perfect cat-eye—including using scotch tape and spoons—all my future flicks are fly.
Sat, Oct 13, 2018
Source: Beauty News

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